Titania

New poem celebrating the anniversary of William Herschel's Jan. 11, 1787 discovery of the moons of Uranus--Titania and Oberon.  This piece unites images from a 19th century engraving of Oberon and Titania from Cassell and Company, Ltd and a Voyager 2 picture of the moon, Titania (photo credit: NASA, Voyager 2, Calvin J. Hamilton).  The text is borrowed G. Hill's "Titania's Banquet, a Mask" (1839) and Arthur Shearly Cripps'  "Titania and Other Poems" (1900).

New poem celebrating the anniversary of William Herschel’s Jan. 11, 1787 discovery of the moons of Uranus–Titania and Oberon. This piece unites images from a 19th century engraving of Oberon and Titania from Cassell and Company, Ltd and a Voyager 2 picture of Titania the moon (photo credit: NASA, Voyager 2, Calvin J. Hamilton). The text is borrowed from G. Hill’s “Titania’s Banquet, a Mask” (1839) and Arthur Shearly Cripps’ “Titania and Other Poems” (1900).

5 comments
    • Thanks!! I’m always so grateful for your comments. Thrilled you like the poem. Hope you’re having a lovely week.

  1. What a great anniversary to celebrate — I had no idea that the discovery was made on Jan. 11. I’m a bit late but just wanted to add that I agree, like the other commentator, about the way you’ve combined not only texts but also images. The illustration of your poem really arrested me: I felt I didn’t have a choice but to check it out!

    • Hey, wow . . . thanks so much! So glad you were lured in to read the poem. I like to experiment with graphic elements and text; sometimes the combination works, sometimes it doesn’t or doesn’t completely work. Perhaps the most important of the process for me is the risk-taking . . . the chance that the poem + art may pull apart at the seams. Something felt right about “Titania.” I had a strong intuition that it worked.

      • “the chance that the poem + art may pull apart at the seams” — that’s a really great comment. I’m going to ask you about that very soon — that’s at the top of my question list!

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