Hope hov’rest near

Bits of Henry Ingram's 1815 poem "The Flower of Wye" borrowed to create a poem about the International Space Station.  The initial cap "H" is part of an ISS image (photo credit: Peter Stetson and John Stetson).The background text is a 2004 Congressional Budget Office budgetary analysis of NASA's future space vision.

Bits of Henry Ingram’s 1815 poem “The Flower of Wye” borrowed to create a poem about the International Space Station. The initial cap “H” is part of an ISS image (photo credit: Peter Stetson and John Stetson).
The background text is a 2004 Congressional Budget Office budgetary analysis of NASA’s future space vision.

5 comments
  1. I love all the juxtaposition in this, especially the article about funding against the word “hope” in the poem. We keep on hoping …
    Fictional Planet

    • So glad you like it! I was struggling with what to put as the background text and then it struck me. Funding is always in the background driving the decisions. It made me unspeakably happy to overlay the budget text with the dream/adventure/poem layer that matters to me. I see similar projects in my future! 🙂

  2. What I like is the way that this format conveys the meaning: that poetry floats to the top and transcends the dull bureaucratese. (Thank God we live in a world where poetry still has the power to do that!)

    • Thanks, Nick! You describe so beautifully what I was hoping the final piece would convey. It’s comforting to know that I hit the mark. Poetry absolutely still has power! (And a sidebar: I haven’t forgotten that I owe you a response to your lovely questions. Sorry I’m so behind schedule. Would this Friday be OK?)

      • Totally, don’t worry! When you have time is fine with me. I’ve been behind schedule too so I understand! By the way, I was just glad to check out the blog roll and see this poem today. It helped clear my head of all the clutter of memos and reports I was working on. So I thank you for that! Send to me when you’re able!

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