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Monthly Archives: March 2013

The Library of Congress, Copyright Office's "Catalog of Copyright Entries, Third Series: 1968" redacted into a "poem."  Graphics from the "Lunar Module, LM10 through LM14, Vehicle Familiarization Manual" created in 1969 by Grumman.

The Library of Congress, Copyright Office’s “Catalog of Copyright Entries, Third Series: 1968” redacted into a “poem.” Graphics from the “Lunar Module, LM10 through LM14, Vehicle Familiarization Manual” created in 1969 by Grumman.

American astronomer Henrietta S. Leavitt (one of Pickering's "computers") provided readers a walking tour of the Harvard Observatory grounds in a 1896 book "Cambridge Sketches."  I have redacted her tour into general poem about the wonders of viewing.

American astronomer Henrietta S. Leavitt (one of Pickering’s “computers”) provided readers a walking tour of the Harvard Observatory grounds in a 1896 book “Cambridge Sketches.” I have redacted her tour into general poem about the wonders of viewing.

Text from the 1728 "A Trip to the Moon" by Murtagh McDermot (pseudo.)  The background is a closeup from an original NASA-LRC Lunar Orbiter II poster I purchased at an observatory yard sale.

Text borrowed from the 1728 “A Trip to the Moon” by Murtagh McDermot (pseudonym) to create a poem.  The background is a closeup from an original NASA-LRC Lunar Orbiter II poster I purchased at an observatory yard sale.

“The Literary Gazette: A Weekly Journal of Literature, Arts, and Sciences,” Volume 13 (1829) redacted into a poem.  Stars are taken from a photo of the globular star cluster Messier 107.  Photo credit: ESA/NASA.

“The Literary Gazette: A Weekly Journal of Literature, Arts, and Sciences,” Volume 13 (1829) redacted into a poem. Stars are taken from a photo of the globular star cluster Messier 107. Photo credit: ESA/NASA.

A page of Nathanial Hawthorne's short story "Wakefield" borrowed for a poem.  Text from "The Complete Writings of Nathaniel Hawthorne," published in 1900.  The poem is "seen" through the windows of the cuppola of the International Space Station.  (Image credit: NASA)

A page of Nathanial Hawthorne’s short story “Wakefield” borrowed for a poem. Text from “The Complete Writings of Nathaniel Hawthorne,” published in 1900. The poem is “seen” through the windows of the cuppola of the International Space Station. (Image credit: NASA)